Why 2019 is One of the Best Years to Travel Solo

The travel industry is responding to the trend in solo travel with waived fees and special tours.
 

Illustration by Marc Nipp

Illustration by Marc Nipp

When it comes to travelling alone, it’s pretty easy to see the perks: going solo means you can do exactly what you want, when you want, and you’re more likely to engage with locals and fellow travellers. But, with the high cost of hotel rooms and single-supplement fees, travelling alone isn’t always the most economical option.

Luckily, the industry is catching on and many companies are starting to cater to solo travellers. Hotels across the UK and Europe offer single rooms—we especially love The Hoxton, Holborn, for its single-friendly “shoebox” rooms—and resorts in the Caribbean are hosting “Singles Weeks,” where the single-supplement fees are waived for certain periods of time throughout the year.

Plus, there’s plenty of tour companies offering options to solo travellers—in 2018, Intrepid Travel began running a selection of solo-only tours (including a new eight-day Cuba itinerary) in response to the 24-per cent growth in solo bookings the company experienced in 2017. And, since Intrepid says about 50 per cent of all bookings are solo, the company does not require solo travellers to pay the single-supplement fee but instead pairs up people for shared accommodation.

Read more: 

Travelling Solo Around the World

The Best Places for Solo Travel

26 Reasons to Travel in 2019, From ‘A’ to ‘Z’

 

[This story appears in the January 2019 issue of WestJet Magazine]